California State University Stanislaus, Endangered Species Recovery Program.  Rabbit graphic courtesey Tristan Edgarian

News

  • Recently added publications




  • Brian Cypher of ESRP is awarded The Wildlife Society Western Section's Raymond F. Dasmann Award for the Professional of the Year


    Brian Cypher

    Brian Cypher

    The Wildlife Society Western Section Annual Meeting in Sacramento, CA, Jan. 31, 2013

    Raymond F. Dasmann Award for the Professional of the Year

    The Western Section of The Wildlife Society presents the "Raymond F. Dasmann Professional of the Year Award" to professionals within California, Nevada, Hawaii, and Guam who have made an exemplary contribution to wildlife management by individuals who have developed, applied, administered or completed an especially significant program of management, education, research or communications that results in an outstanding contribution to wildlife resources in the Western Section geographic area.. The purpose of the award is to define outstanding professional achievements, and to demonstrate to those individuals who make such contributions that Western Section members recognize and appreciate their efforts and the example they set for other professionals. The Dasmann Award is the Section's highest honor for wildlife professionals.




  • Rescuing rabbits at the San Joaquin River Wildlife Refuge

    Tristan Edgarian of ESRP during rabbit rescue efforts

    Tristan Edgarian

    Recent flooding along the San Joaquin River can threaten endangered riparian brush rabbits. ESRP staff along with Fish and Wildlife service staff conducted a rescue effort.

    Photos here

    Because there are only a handful of places these rabbits live, a population was established at the refuge to reduce the risk of extinction. Comprehensive, multi-agency conservation and restoration measures have been taken since a flood in 2006, including building up areas of higher ground to allow rabbits (and other animals) to escape during floods. In additional to rescue efforts, flooding allows managers to test the effectiveness of these features.




  • Philip Leitner of ESRP is awarded The Wildlife Society Western Section's Raymond F. Dasmann Award for the Professional of the Year


    Philip Leitner

    Photo of Phil from St. Mary's College Faculty Profile

    The Wildlife Society Western Section Annual Meeting in Riverside, CA, Feb. 10, 2011

    Raymond F. Dasmann Award for the Professional of the Year

    The Western Section of The Wildlife Society presents the "Raymond F. Dasmann Professional of the Year Award" to professionals within California, Nevada, Hawaii, and Guam who have made an exemplary contribution to wildlife management by individuals who have developed, applied, administered or completed an especially significant program of management, education, research or communications that results in an outstanding contribution to wildlife resources in the Western Section geographic area.. The purpose of the award is to define outstanding professional achievements, and to demonstrate to those individuals who make such contributions that Western Section members recognize and appreciate their efforts and the example they set for other professionals. The Dasmann Award is the Section's highest honor for wildlife professionals.

    The full text of the award speech is here




  • New video documenting endangered species in the San Joaquin Valley and the Carrizo Plain

    Hidden in Plain View:
    Wildlife of the San Joaquin Valley & the Carrizo Plain




  • New book co-edited by Brian Cypher of ESRP
    Urban Carnivores: Ecology, Conflict, and Conservation


    book cover

    Edited by Stanley D. Gehrt, Seth P. D. Riley, and Brian L. Cypher

    With over half of the world’s human population now living in cities, human-carnivore interaction in urban areas is a growing area of concern and research for wildlife managers, conservationists, urban planners, and the public at large. This volume brings together leading international carnivore researchers to explore the unique biological and ecological issues associated with mammalian carnivores in urban landscapes.

    Carnivores in urban areas are fascinating from an ecological standpoint. They elicit great passions-positive and negative-among humans and present difficult challenges for wildlife conservationists and managers. The first section of the book discusses the field of urban ecology and the many potential roles of carnivores in urban ecosystems, details the general behavior and ecology of this group of mammals, and addresses the human side of potential conflicts between people and carnivores in cities. The second section provides species accounts of the most common urban carnivores, including raccoons, coyotes, foxes, skunks, and mountain lions. A separate chapter examines the very specialized place of domesticated cats and dogs. The last section compares how various carnivore species fare in cities, looks at the utility of existing conservation and conflict management efforts, and suggests directions for further research and future management initiatives.

    This thorough examination of the conflicts and complications surrounding urban wildlife is the first to focus specifically on carnivores. It includes an extensive bibliography and is an essential reference for wildlife biologists, mammalogists, and urban planners.

    A 25% off discount is available using this order form




  • Recently added publications





About the Program

The Endangered Species Recovery Program is a cooperative research program on biodiversity conservation in central California, administered by California State University, Stanislaus.

The program was established in August 1992 at the request and with the support of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Bureau of Reclamation, under the direction of Dr. Dan Williams at CSU Stanislaus. Over the past decade, ESRP has grown into a cooperative research program working with local, State, and Federal agencies, non-governmental organizations, corporations, and private land owners.

ESRP is composed of about 18 biologists, students, and support staff, several research associates, and numerous collaborators in government and universities worldwide whose combined expertise and contributions are integral to the recovery of threatened and endangered species in Central California. ESRP biologists are based in Fresno, Turlock, Bakersfield, and the Bay Area.

Mission Statement

The Endangered Species Recovery Program's mission is to facilitate endangered species recovery and resolve conservation conflicts through scientifically based recovery planning and implementation.

Narrative

The central elements in the recovery of endangered and threatened species are: identifying the biological processes critical to achieving self-sustaining populations of jeopardized species and their ecosystems; developing sound species recovery and natural community management prescriptions; and identifying the social interests and entities that must be reconciled and work together in implementing recovery strategies. Such a recovery process necessarily implies the integration of all planning and implementation actions within a broadly inclusive public-private partnership to achieve a product that is environmentally sound, economically feasible, and socially equitable.

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